The Cotswolds

TheCotswolds

Lying across the boundaries of several English counties; mainly Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire, but also parts of Wiltshire, Somerset, Worcestershire and Warwickshire, the Cotswolds is an area of outstanding natural beauty, and it’s easy to see why. Golden coloured Cotswold stone villages, historic towns, grand stately homes and rolling countryside unrivalled bar none in the UK, the Cotswolds is the epitome of quintessential rural England.

 

Bath, Somerset

Bath, Somerset

 

Bath is a town set in the rolling countryside of southwest England, known for its natural hot springs and 18th-century Georgian architecture. The city became a spa in AD 60 when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon. However, Bath became popular as a spa town during the Georgian era, leaving a heritage of Georgian architecture crafted from Bath stone, including the Royal Crescent, Circus, Pump Room and Assembly Rooms. The city in all its glory has been a popular tourist destination ever since, today attracting one million staying visitors and 3.8 million day visitors every year.

 

Salcombe

Salcombe

Salcombe is located in the most southerly part of Devon and is surrounded by picturesque villages, magnificent coastal scenery and stunning beaches. A traditional shellfish fishing town, Salcombe is a reflection of what most will envisage when thinking of an English seaside village; small, thin roads, a slow pace of life, friendly locals and beautiful, quaint buildings.

 

Stratford-upon-Avon

Stratford Upon Avon

Stratford-upon-Avon, a medieval market town in England’s West Midlands, is the 16th-century birthplace of possibly the most famous writer in the English language, William Shakespeare. Steeped in culture and history and set in the beautiful rural Warwickshire countryside on the banks of the river Avon, Stratford and its architectural splendour is undoubtedly quintessentially English.

 

Rye, Sussex

Rye, Sussex

 

Rye is the smallest location on the list with a population of less than 5000, but it has been an important town in England since medieval times. It was once one of England’s greatest smuggling ports, and even provided ships to the King. Although Rye is no longer on the coast of the English Channel, the history and charm of this town still draws thousands of tourists every year. Cobblestone streets, 14th-century pubs and a great British fare, Rye summarises the stereotype of what life in England is really about.

 

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